Lend me an EAR

I’ve posted a couple of Poems of One Words (The ART of, You are what you EAT) , which are a play on a word which is found in other words to which it shares some relationship.  They are visual poems rather than for recitation, because it only in seeing them that you get the word play.  I’ve added photos (most are my own photos) to enhance the visual poetry.

Lend me an EAR

hEAR

hEARt

fEAR

tEARs

yEAR

EARn

EARthquake

wEARy

lEARn

yEARn

nuclEAR

Holy Water

“Thus, for example, to bless water, making it ‘holy water,’ may have two entirely different meanings. It may mean, on the one hand, the transformation of something profane, and thus religiously void or neutral, into something sacred, in which case the main religious meaning of ‘holy water’ is precisely that it is no longer ‘mere’ water, and is in fact opposed to it – as the sacred is to the profane. Here the act of blessing reveals nothing about water, and thus about matter or world, but on the contrary makes them irrelevant to the new function of water as ‘holy water.’ The sacred posits the profane as precisely profane, i.e. religiously meaningless. On the other hand,  the same act of blessing may mean the revelation of the true ‘nature’ and ‘destiny’ of water, and thus of the world – it may be the epiphany and the fulfillment of their ‘sacramentality’. By being restored through the blessing to its proper function, the ‘holy water’ is revealed as the true, full, adequate water, and matter becomes again means of communion with and knowledge of God. Now anyone who is acquainted with the content and the text of the great prayer of blessing of water – at Baptism and Epiphany – knows without any doubt that they belong to the second of two meanings mentioned above. ” (Alexander Schmemann, For the Life of the World: Sacraments and Orthodoxy, pg. 132)