Holy Thursday (2015)

Christianity is a religion of both anticipation and fulfillment. The Old Testament anticipates the New. Our life in the Church anticipates our life in the Kingdom of God which is to come.

“When the disciples asked Christ where they should prepare the Passover meal, they were of course talking about the Jewish Passover. And that was what they prepared. ‘Whereas our Passover, the Christian Passover, has been prepared by Christ. And He has not only prepared it, but He Himself has become the Passover.’ At the Last Supper, Christ celebrated both the Jewish and the Christian Passover, ‘both the Passover that was the type and the Passover that was the reality. Christ was doing exactly what an artist does when on the same canvas he first draws an outline and puts in the shading, and then adds the actual colors. At the very same table, He both sketched out the Passover that was a type and added in the true Passover.’ (St. John Chrysostom)”   (Hiermonk Gregorios, THE DIVINE LITURGY: A COMMENTARY IN THE LIGHT OF THE FATHERS, p 3)

God had placed the first humans He created in a garden filled with luscious fruits to be eaten at will. Food was thus given as a way for us to commune with our Creator. At the last supper, we see fruit – the grape – now crushed into wine – being transfigured into the Blood of Christ.   The world crushes the grape to make wine; Christ uses the wine to restore us to health.   Food becomes communion with God again.

“Before Christ was crucified, He celebrated the Divine Liturgy (c.f. Luke 22:19-20) – the remembrance of His Passion on the Cross. And He commanded us to celebrate it in the same way: to recall those things that seem ‘to betoken weakness, namely the Cross, the Passion and death’.   Why, we may ask, when Christ said, ‘This is my Body, this is my Blood’, did He not add ‘…which raised the dead, which healed lepers’, but only ‘…which is broken for you, which is poured out for your sake’? Why does He not recall His miracles, but rather His Passion? ‘Because the Passion was more necessary than the miracles… His Passion is the very cause of our salvation…. Whereas the miracles took place in order that it might be believed that the Lord is truly the Savior.’ (St. Nicholas Cabasilas) Miracles are a confirmation of Christ’s divinity; the holy Passion offers us salvation and Christ the Savior.” (Hiermonk Gregorios, THE DIVINE LITURGY: A COMMENTARY IN THE LIGHT OF THE FATHERS, p 72)

Salvation gives not just sanity to our minds, or eternity to our souls, it brings healing to our bodies as well. And not only to our bodies, but all of creation is transformed by the death and resurrection of Christ through whom the world was created and redeemed.

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