The Death of St. Macrina

Today we honor St. Macrina, who died in 379 AD. This is how St. Gregory of Nyssa described the death of his sister:

Macrina“At evening her bed was turned to the east, and ceasing to talk with us she now spoke to God in prayer, her hands outstretched, murmuring in a low voice so that we could just catch what she was saying:

‘O Lord you have freed us from the fear of death. You have made the end of our life here into the beginning of true life for us. You give rest to our bodies for a time in sleep, and then you awaken them again with the sound of the last trumpet. Our earthly body, formed by your hands, you cosign in trust to the earth, and then once more you reclaim it, transfiguring with immortality and grace whatever in us is mortal or deformed. You have opened for us the way to resurrection, and given to those that fear you the sign of the holy cross as their emblem, to destroy the enemy and to save our life. Eternal God, on you have I depended from my mother’s womb, you have I loved with all the strength of my soul, to you have I dedicated my flesh and soul from my youth until now. Set by my side an angel of light, to guide me to the place of repose, where are the waters of rest, among the holy Fathers. You have broken the fiery sword and restored to paradise the thief who was crucified with you and implored your mercy: remember me also in your Kingdom, for I too have been crucified with you. Let not the dread abyss separate me from your elect. Let not the envious one bar the way before me. But forgive me and accept my soul into your hand, spotless and undefiled, as incense in your sight.’

Ending this prayer, she made the sign of the cross on her eyes, mouth and heart. The fever increased, and she could speak no more.” (The Time of the Spirit: Readings Through the Christian Year, p 92)

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2 thoughts on “The Death of St. Macrina

  1. Pingback: The Death of St. Macrina | Orthodox Magazine Orthodox Magazine

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