St. Gregory of Nyssa on the Forefathers

As we Orthodox get near to the Feast of the Nativity in the Flesh of our Lord, God and Savior Jesus Christ, we are reminded about all of those faithful men and women who came before Christ – both looking for the promise’s fulfillment and witnessing to the coming of the Messiah.  We commemorate the forefathers and ancestors of Christ on the two respective Sundays before the Feast of Christmas.

The Church Fathers saw in these predecessors of Jesus not just saints, prophets, and martyrs, but models of virtuous living.  St. Gregory of Nyssa for example describes the virtues he saw in the various people found in the Scriptures – the people we remember on the Sundays before the Nativity.  In the foreward to the English Translation of Gregory of Nyssa: The Life of Moses, Fr. John Meyendorff writes:

Each Old Testament worthy became for Gregory the model of a virtue. Thus he says: “Scripture teaches us that Noah was righteous, Abraham faithful, Moses meek, Daniel wise, Joseph chaste, Job blameless, and David great-souled.” In his panegyric on Meletius, Gregory declares that he possessed the gentleness of David, the understanding of Solomon, the goodness of Moses, the scrupulousness of Samuel, the chastity of Joseph, the wisdom of Daniel, and the zeal of Elijah.

Abraham is described in Against Eunomius in terms very similar to those applied to Moses. Abraham surpassed his countrymen in their own wisdom, the philosophy of the Chaldaeans. The migration of Abraham was no mere spatial journey: He stretched his human capacity in order to attain to God. Making each new discovery a stepping stone to another, he ever “strained ahead for what was still to come” (Phil. 313, the text verse of The Life of Moses). He left all sense and perception behind and arrived by faith at the knowledge that God is greater and more sublime than any token by which he may be known. (p. 20)

For us, in the Sundays before Christmas we evoke the names of Christ’s ancestors and forefathers so that we can remember the virtues they modeled in order to imitate their holiness.